Approvals / Accreditations

  • New York Career Institute is accredited by the New York State Board of Regents and the Commissioner of Education, a nationally recognized accrediting agency located at 89 Washington Avenue, Albany, NY 12234 (518)474-2593
  • Approved by the U.S. Department of Education to provide Title IV financial aid to eligible students
  • Approved by the National Court Reporters Association (NCRA) for the AOS Degree Court Reporting Program
  • Approved by the New York State Education Department for the training of Veterans
  • Authorized by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security for Non-Immigrant Alien students
  • Authorized Testing Center for the National Healthcareer Association Examinations

Memberships

  • National Court Reporters Association
  • American Association of Paralegal Education
  • National Federation of Paralegal Associations, Inc.
  • National Healthcareer Association
  • National Notary Association

Consumer Information

Protecting Your Personal Information

NYCI carefully protects all personal information in its possession regarding students and their families. The college employs office procedures and password-protected computer systems to ensure the security of paper and electronic records. The college does not disclose its security procedures to students or the general public to protect the effectiveness of those procedures. Access to social security numbers and other personally identifiable information (PII) is strictly limited to those School Officials (see definition below) with a need-to-know, as determined by the Associate Campus Director.

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA) provides current and former students with the right to inspect and review educational records, the right to seek to amend those records, the right to limit disclosure of information from the records and the right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education. Applicants or students may also waive their rights to inspect confidential letters or statements of recommendation.

School Official

In accordance with FERPA, the student’s consent is not required when a School Official has a legitimate educational interest in the student’s educational record; that is, if the official needs to review this information in order to fulfill his/her professional responsibility. However, this does not constitute authorization to share that information with a third party without the student’s written consent.

A “School Official” is a person employed by the college in an administrative, supervisory, academic, research, or support staff position; a person or company with whom the college has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor or accrediting agency); a person serving on the Board of Directors; or a student serving in an official position/capacity, or assisting a School Official in performing his/ her tasks.

Financial Aid Information

Certain information necessary for the processing of federal financial aid programs may be disclosed to parents of dependent students. In order for a person to be considered a “parent” for this purpose, the individual must be listed as such on the student’s FAFSA application.

Directory Information

School Officials may not disclose personally identifiable information about a student nor permit inspection of a student’s records without the student’s written permission, unless such action is covered by certain exceptions permitted by FERPA. Under the provisions of the Act, a college may disclose information about a student if it has designated that the information is “Directory Information”. NYCI has designated the following as Directory Information:

student’s name
hometown
telephone number
email address
previous institution(s) attended
enrollment status
dates of attendance
academic program
date of graduation/expected date of graduation
honors or awards received
Student’s Rights Under FERPA

Right to Review Educational Records: FERPA affords students certain rights with respect to their educational records. Students have the right to review their educational records within 45 days of the day the college receives a written request for access. Students requesting a review should submit to the President a written request that identifies the record(s) they wish to inspect. The President will notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected.

Right to Request an Amendment: Students have the right to request an amendment to educational records that are believed to be inaccurate. Students requesting a change must write to the School Official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate. If the School Official decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, NYCI will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of his or her right to a hearing with the President regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing.

Right to Consent to Disclosures: Students have the right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s educational records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent.

Right to File Complaint: Students have the right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by NYCI to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the office that administers FERPA is:

Family Policy Compliance Office

U.S. Department of Education

400 Maryland Avenue, SW

Washington, DC 20202-4605

Rights and Responsibilities of Students Receiving Financial Aid

NYCI wants our students to understand what the requirements to receive financial aid, and your rights throughout the process.

Students have the right to obtain from the school:

the names of its accrediting or licensing organizations (see academic catalog);
information about the school’s programs; its instructional, laboratory and other physical facilities and its faculty (see academic catalog);
the cost of attendance;
the types of financial assistance available, including information on
all federal, state, local, private and institutional financial aid
programs;
the procedures and deadlines for submitting applications for each
available financial aid program;
the eligibility criteria used to select financial aid recipients;
process used to determine student financial aid and how to apply;
amount of student financial need, the amount that has been met (see student award letter);
the type and amount of assistance in a student financial aid package
and an explanation of each award (see student award letter);
the portion of the financial aid award that consists of loans that must be re-paid, and what
portion is grant aid that does not need to be repaid (see student award letter);
interest rate on any loan, the total amount for repayment, the
length of time for repayment, the date to start repayment and
cancellation or deferment provisions that apply (entrance and exit interviews);
how to obtain a reconsideration of an aid package (by contacting the Financial Aid office), if they believe that a mistake
has been made or if enrollment or if the student’s financial circumstances have
changed;
the school’s policy and the Financial Aid Office’s policy on refunds to students who withdraw or are dropped;
the policy/process used by NYCI to determine whether students are
making satisfactory academic progress and what happens if students are
not; and
any special facilities and services available to persons with
disabilities.
The information for many of the bullet points above can be obtained by clicking on the included hyperlink. For those bullets that do not contain a hyperlink, most information can be obtained from the NYCI Academic Catalog.

Student Responsibilities

It is the responsibility of students to:

review and consider all information about the school’s program
before enrolling;
pay special attention to the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA),
complete it accurately and submit it on time at the correct website.
Errors can delay or prevent students from receiving aid;
meet all deadlines for applying or reapplying for aid;
provide any and all additional documentation, verification, corrections
and/or new information requested by the Financial Aid Office, including tax returns and other personal and financial documents;
read, understand and keep copies of all forms which they are
asked to sign;
comply with the provisions of any student loan promissory note and all other
agreements that they must sign;
promptly notify the school and student loan lender of any change in name, address or attendance
status;
understand the school’s Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy;
understand NYCI’s refund policy and the Financial Aid
Office’s Return to Title IV Refund policy;
attend and participate in an “Entrance Interview” before borrowing federal student loans;
attend and participate in an “Exit Interview” prior to graduation or upon withdrawal from NYCI, if you have
borrowed federal loans; and
honor all copyrights and refrain from unauthorized duplication of copyrighted material.

Annual Campus Crime Reporting and Policy

The Jeanne Clery Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act of 1990 (Clery Act) requires colleges and schools to provide students and applicants a detailed report of crime statistics for the prior three years.

Criminal Offenses – On Campus/Non-Campus Property 2008 2009 2010
a. Murder/Non-negligent manslaughter 0 0 0
b. Negligent manslaughter 0 0 0
c. Sex offenses – Forcible 0 0 0
d. Sex offenses – Non-forcible
(incest and statutory rape only) 0 0 0
e. Robbery 0 0 0
f. Aggravated assault 0 0 0
g. Burglary 0 0 0
h. Motor vehicle theft 0 0 0
i. Arson 0 0 0
Criminal Offenses – Public Property 2008 2009 2010
a. Murder/Non-negligent manslaughter 0 0 0
b. Negligent manslaughter 0 0 0
c. Sex offenses – Forcible 0 0 0
d. Sex offenses – Non-forcible
(incest and statutory rape only) 0 0 0
e. Robbery 0 0 0
f. Aggravated assault 0 0 0
g. Burglary 0 0 0
h. Motor vehicle theft 0 0 0
i. Arson 0 0 0
Hate Crimes – On Campus/Non-Campus Property 2008 2009 2010
a. Murder/Non-negligent manslaughter 0 0 0
b. Negligent manslaughter 0 0 0
c. Sex offenses – Forcible 0 0 0
d. Sex offenses – Non-forcible
(incest and statutory rape only) 0 0 0
e. Robbery 0 0 0
f. Aggravated assault 0 0 0
g. Burglary 0 0 0
h. Motor vehicle theft 0 0 0
i. Arson 0 0 0
j. Any other crime involving bodily injury 0 0 0
Hate Crimes – Public Property 2008 2009 2010
a. Murder/Non-negligent manslaughter 0 0 0
b. Negligent manslaughter 0 0 0
c. Sex offenses – Forcible 0 0 0
d. Sex offenses – Non-forcible
(incest and statutory rape only) 0 0 0
e. Robbery 0 0 0
f. Aggravated assault 0 0 0
g. Burglary 0 0 0
h. Motor vehicle theft 0 0 0
i. Arson 0 0 0
j. Any other crime involving bodily injury 0 0 0
Arrests – On Campus/Non-Campus Property 2008 2009 2010
a. Illegal weapons possession 0 0 0
b. Drug law violations 0 0 0
c. Liquor law violations 0 0 0
Disciplinary Actions – On Campus/Non-Campus Property 2008 2009 2010
a. Illegal weapons possession 0 0 0
b. Drug law violations 0 0 0
c. Liquor law violations 0 0 0
Arrests – Public Property 2008 2009 2010
a. Illegal weapons possession 0 0 0
b. Drug law violations 0 0 0
c. Liquor law violations 0 0 0
Disciplinary Actions – Public Property 2008 2009 2010
a. Illegal weapons possession 0 0 0
b. Drug law violations 0 0 0
c. Liquor law violations 0 0 0
Definitions
NYCI operates a campus which does not consist of discrete buildings, but rather sections or floors of an office/retail building. For purposes of Clery Act data collection and reporting, the following definitions apply:

Campus: Areas of buildings which are leased, owned or controlled by NYCI, including any classrooms, administrative offices, faculty offices, along with any hallways, lavatories, storage areas, stairwells, elevators or other areas used exclusively by NYCI staff, faculty or students.

Non-Campus Property: All other areas of campus buildings that are not otherwise included in the definition of “campus” (above), including any hallways, elevators or outdoor areas owned or controlled by the building/development owners and routinely used by NYCI’s students. These areas are considered part of the “‘campus” for the purposes of the statistics above.

Public Property: Any public thoroughfares, streets, alleys, sidewalks and/or public parking facilities that are immediately adjacent to, and accessible from, the campus.

Campus Security Policies
Timely Warning: In addition to the required annual Campus Security Report, NYCI will provide a timely warning to the campus community of any occurrences of the following crimes that are reported to campus officials or local police agencies and are considered to represent a serious or continuing threat to students and employees:

homicide
sex offense
robbery
burglary
aggravated assault
motor vehicle theft
arson
hate crimes
arrests for liquor/drug or weapons violations
campus discipline for liquor/drugs/weapons
If the school is aware of such a crime, and the management of the school feels that a serious and continuing threat to students and employees exists, the Accociate Campus Director will post notices in various locations throughout the campus, including all entrance/exit doors from the campus areas of the building. These notices will remain in place for ten days, or longer if school management feels a continuing threat remains.

Security of Campus Facilities: NYCI campus facilities are private property. All visitors must report to the reception desk and be admitted to the grounds/buildings. Any unauthorized visitation or other trespassing on NYCI’s facilities, including trespassing by students during non-business hours, is strictly prohibited.

Crime Prevention Program: NYCI does not maintain dormitories or other facilities that are used outside of regular school hours. Sufficient faculty and staff are available throughout the building and grounds during business hours to reduce the likelihood of crime during school hours. Students and employees are encouraged to be vigilant and observant when in the non-campus or public areas, and to protect themselves and each other by reporting suspicious or illegal activity to proper authorities immediately.

Campus Law Enforcement: NYCI does not maintain a law enforcement department or employ a security force, however, the building in which the NYCI facilities are housed does maintain security personnel. All crimes and other emergencies will be handled by the building security (if applicable) or local law enforcement agencies as appropriate.

Drug and Alcohol Policies: NYCI maintains a strong Drug and Alcohol Policy for the campus community.

Sexual Assault Prevention/Reporting: NYCI does not maintain dormitories or other facilities that are used outside of regular school hours. Sufficient faculty and staff are available throughout the building and grounds during business hours to make such an occurrence unlikely. Any crime, including sexual assault, on or off campus, should be reported immediately to the local police department or other appropriate law enforcement agency.

Distribution of Report/Policy: A notice of this report and policy statement will be given to all students and employees annually. Those wishing a printed copy of this report are welcomed to print this webpage, or may contact any member of the NYCI administration for a printed copy.

Code of Ethics for Student Loans

Purpose of this Code
NYCI has established this student loan Code of Ethics to set clear limits on the interactions that the college and its employees may have with student loan lenders, to ensure that college employees maintain the highest standards of administrative and academic integrity, and to require that all employees conduct themselves in an ethical and professional manner in their interactions with students and families.

Hence, NYCI has set forth this policy to codify and clarify our collegiate ethics standard with regard to education (student) loan lenders, servicers, and or guarantors, and to provide assurances that questionable practices that have been criticized at other educational institutions are not occurring at New York Career Institute.

Code of Ethics Policy
“Preferred” lender lists and endorsements of lenders. NYCI does not create, maintain, or distribute any listing of “preferred” or “recommended” education loan lenders/servicers, nor will NYCI staff endorse any particular education loan lender/servicer.

Promotion of Education Loans: NYCI does not engage in a “revenue sharing” arrangement with any student loan lender, servicer or guarantor, nor enter into any arrangement designed to promote the products, services, and/or public image of any student loan lender, servicer, or guarantor. This section does not prohibit the college from distributing informational materials in compliance with federal regulation 34 C.F.R. 682.200(b)(5)(ii).

Non-Discrimination in Loan Certification: NYCI participates in the FDSLP and hence does not certify federal student loans through private lenders. The Financial Aid Office will certify any private non-federal loan application in a timely manner for an eligible student through any lender, servicer or guarantor. Financial Aid advisors neither favor nor discriminate against any particular student loan lender, servicer, or provider in giving counsel to student and parent borrowers. However, nothing in this policy shall be construed to prevent properly trained Financial Aid advisors from providing students and parents with good counsel and honest answers about private loan costs, interest rates, processing times, methods of payment, and past customer service experience to assist the borrower in making an educated lender choice.

Prohibition Against Gifts: Neither NYCI nor any of its employees will accept any gift, gratuity, favor, discount, entertainment, hospitality, benefit, or any other item of more than a nominal value from any student loan lender, servicer or guarantor, except as specifically permitted in federal regulation 34 C.F.R. 682.200(b)(5)(ii). Gifts to family members of NYCI employees are considered as a gift to the employee if the gift was given in relation to the position of the NYCI employee. Nothing in this section shall be construed as prohibiting NYCI employees from conducting normal banking business with a student loan lender; or receiving discounts, premiums, or gifts that are available to the general public based upon that normal banking business.

Contracting Arrangements/Advisory Groups: Financial aid employees or any other NYCI staff member that may have any responsibility with respect to educational loans may not accept from any student loan lender, servicer or guarantor any type of fee, payment, or other financial benefit as compensation for consulting or other services provided on behalf of the lender relating to educational loans; nor shall any employee accept payment for services or reimbursement of expenses related to education lending advisory boards, focus groups, facility tours or similar activities from any student loan lender, servicer, or guarantor.

Staffing Assistance: NYCI does not utilize student loan lender, servicer, or guarantor staff to work in our offices, nor will we allow them to perform the work of college personnel in other locations. Further, we do not permit any non-employee to identify him/herself as an NYCI employee.

Cost of Attendance

NYCI has developed the following Cost of Attendance (COA) “budgets” to help you plan for the expenses associated with your education. These budgets include estimated costs for both ” direct costs” (like tuition and fees) for which the school will send you a billing statement, and ” indirect costs” (such as transportation) that are estimates of what an average student spends (i.e. to travel back and forth to school). These ” indirect costs” are not part of any billing statement that you will get from NYCI, but should be considered when you plan for your total college expenses.

How Cost Budgets are Created: The tuition and fees, and the books and supplies costs are actual costs for these institutional charges. All other amounts are averages/estimates based upon what students would routinely spend while living moderately in the New York City metro area.

Cost of Attendance (COA )Chart: Direct costs are shown in BLUE, indirect costs are shown in Gray.

Average Costs for One Academic Year (three trimesters) 2015-2016 (all programs)

Dependent

Independent

Tuition & Fees

$13,650
$13,650

Books & Supplies

$1,512

$1,512
Room & Board

$ 1,500

$ 4,000

Personal Expenses

$ 800

$ 1,600.00

Transportation

$ 900.00

$ 900.00

Avg. Student Loan Fees

$ 20.00

$ 20.00

Standard COA Budget:

$ 3,220 plus tuition, fees, books and supplies

$ 6,520 plus tuition, fees, books and supplies

What To Do If Your Costs Are Higher: If your expenses are significantly higher than the Cost of Attendance budget amounts shown above, you should speak with your Financial Aid Advisor.

Living Expenses Paid by Other Government Grants: If your living expenses are already paid by other government grants or outside scholarships/programs, NYCI will be able to reduce your loan borrowing to keep your debt (and eventually your payments) lower. Speak with your Financial Aid Advisor about strategies for reducing your loan borrowing and managing your federal student loans.

Copyright Infringement Policy

The concept of private property is one of the building blocks of our society. To take the property of another without permission is theft. This concept is also applicable to intellectual property, such as music and video entertainment.

Students and employees at NYCI are prohibited from using school computers, networks, copying machines, document scanners, or other electronic devices for the purpose of illegally duplicating or sharing copyrighted material. This not only includes printed material, but downloaded or shared music, video or other media files.

Students who engage in in the illegal duplication or disribution of copyrighted material using the NYCI’s computers, networks, copying machines, document scanners, or other equipment are subject to diciplinary action, up to and including dismissal.

Student Advisory: Students are advised that NYCI’s computer network is monitored and all network activity can be observed and traced by school officials. The network employs software for the purpose of detecting and preventing the illegal downloading of media files (music, videos, etc.).

Students with questions about downloading and/or intellectual property should consult with the Dean of Academic Affairs.

Drug and Alcohol Policy

Drug and Alcohol Policy – General
NYCI operates under the United States Department of Education’s drug prevention program and the Drug-Free Schools and Workplaces Act of 1988. The college will impose disciplinary sanctions on students and employees as set out in the drug prevention program (consistent with local, state and federal law) up to and including expulsion or termination of employment and referral for prosecution for violations of the Standards of Conduct. A disciplinary sanction may include referral to a self-help rehabilitation program.

Standards of Conduct
NYCI prohibits the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of controlled substances and alcohol by students and employees on the college’s campus or as part of any externship or other off-campus activity. Further, students or employees are prohibited from appearing on campus or at any externship site while their ability to function professionally is impaired by the influence of alcohol or controlled substances, whether or not legally obtained.

Facility Definition
For purposes of this policy, an individual shall be considered “at the college’s facilities” whenever he/she is:

In the NYCI campus building (including non-campus areas within the building)
At any externship site while representing NYCI as a student or employee,
Driving or riding as a passenger in a vehicle which is owned, leased, or controlled by NYCI,
On a field trips or other official off-campus trip.
Alcohol Policy
NYCI prohibits the use of alcohol by students, and the presence of students or employees whose professional performance is impaired by the influence of alcohol at the college’s facilities. This prohibition is necessary because of the effect that the use of alcohol has on an individual’s performance.

Use, and particularly abuse, of alcohol adversely affects an individual’s efficiency, safety and health, and therefore seriously impairs his/her performance. In addition, it constitutes a potential danger to the welfare of NYCI students, NYCI employees, and other persons.

Any student who possesses, uses, or is under the influence of alcohol while at the college’s facilities is subject to discipline, up to and including dismissal from NYCI for violations of the Standards of Conduct.

Any employee whose professional performance is impaired due to the influence of alcohol while at the college’s facilities is subject to disciplinary action, up to and including potential termination of employment.

Rehabilitation: NYCI will encourage and assist employees with alcohol dependencies to seek self-help or professional treatment.

Drug Policy
NYCI prohibits the use or possession of illegal controlled substances, or the presence of students or employees whose professional performance is impaired by the influence of controlled substances (regardless of whether those substances were legally obtained), at the college’s facilities. This prohibition is necessary because of the effect that the use of controlled substances has on an individual’s performance.

The term “controlled substance” in this policy shall be taken to include all chemical substances or drugs listed in any controlled substances acts or regulations applicable under any federal, state or local laws of the U.S.

Furthermore, the use of certain prescription drugs and/or over-the-counter drugs may also, in certain circumstances, affect an individual’s performance and seriously impair his/her abilities.

Prohibitions: The following are strictly prohibited by NYCI:

The illegal possession, distribution, sale or purchase of a controlled substance while at the college’s facilities. (See definition in “Alcohol Policy” section – above).
Possession or use of, or being under the influence of, a controlled substance while at the college’s facilities, except when under a doctor’s direction when such use will not impair the individual’s ability to perform professionally.
The use of other drugs, including prescription drugs and over-the-counter drugs, when such use impairs the individual’s ability to perform or may affect the safety or well-being of others.
Any student who violates the above prohibitions is subject to discipline up to and including dismissal from NYCI for violations of the Standards of Conduct.

Any student convicted on a charge of illegal possession, use, or sale of any controlled substance while off college facilities may be subject to discipline up to and including disciplinary dismissal at the discretion of the President.

Any employee who possesses, uses, or is under the influence of illegal controlled substances while on college facilities or at a college-sponsored event is subject to disciplinary action, including termination of employment.

Rehabilitation: NYCI will encourage and assist employees with chemical dependencies to seek self-help or professional treatment.

Drug Testing: Drug testing of students may be requested under the following circumstances:

When there is a reasonable suspicion that a student is under the influence of drugs or alcohol. “Reasonable suspicion” is a belief based on objective and coherent facts sufficient to lead a prudent person to suspect that the student is under the influence of drugs or alcohol.
When a student is found in possession of alcohol or suspected illicit drugs, or when alcohol or suspected illicit drugs are found in an area controlled or used exclusively by the student (e.g., student’s locker or desk).
Following an incident whose nature indicates impairment of ability or judgment or an incident in which safety precautions were violated or careless acts were performed.
As a part of a testing program instituted as a result of prior drug or alcohol related disciplinary proceeding.
Students who refuse to submit to drug testing under these circumstances may be subject to disciplinary action, including disciplinary dismissal from NYCI.

Confidentiality of Drug Testing Results: Results of drug screening will be part of a student’s medical records and maintained in accordance with applicable law, including the Federal Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA).

Search Policy
NYCI reserves the right to search any location anywhere on the college’s facilities; including any desk, locker or vehicle.

Enforcement Policy
All disciplinary enforcement shall be at the discretion of the President, and shall be based upon the severity of the offense and the actions of the student/employee with regard to the incident. NYCI management shall be the sole judge of the sufficiency of evidence in such matters. The President may also bring the matter to the attention of appropriate law enforcement authorities, if in his/her opinion the evidence so warrants.

NYCI reserves the right to make referrals to law enforcement authorities, and further may permit law enforcement officials to conduct random searches of the college’s facilities at the discretion of the President.

Disciplinary and administrative decisions shall be made in a manner consistent with applicable law. A disciplinary dismissal of a student is not appealable.

Resources/Web Links

Links to Information about Drug and Alcohol addiction, abuse, and recovery:

National Institutes of Health – Facts About Addiction

National Institutes of Health – The Drugs of Addiction

NYS Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services

Links to local agencies that help persons suffering from addiction:

Referral Network for NYC Rehab Centers/Agencies

Standards of Academic Progress

Federal law and regulation require institutions of higher education to establish, publish and enforce minimum academic standards for the continued receipt of Federal Title IV Financial Aid. The academic policies for NYCI are in compliance with Title IV program regulations and are published in the College Catalog. Any changes to the academic progress policy become effective with the publication of a new catalog (or addendum), regardless of any student’s start date or program year.

Standards of Academic Progress

NYCI maintains a set of Academic Progress standards that is applicable to all matriculated students. The charts below and the attached text are the published standards for NYCI. Failure to maintain academic performance in compliance with these standards will result in academic action, including probation and/or dismissal from the academic program. Students who are dismissed from their program also lose eligibility for Federal Title IV Financial Aid, including loans, as described below.

Total Attempted Credits: (as defined below in “Definitions and Grading”)
Minimun Cumulative Grade Point Average
Cumulative Credits Earned/Attempted
29 or less attempted credits
30 to 59 attempted credits
60 or more attempted credits
1.0
1.5
1.8
33 percent
50 percent
60 percent
Additional “Maximum Timeframe” Standard

Eligibility is also limited to students completing their programs within one and one-half times the normal program length. The maximum timeframe is reached when the student has attempted more than one and one-half times the number of credits required to earn their degree(s). The maximum timeframe standard evaluation for transfer students will consider only those credits attempted at NYCI or accepted for transfer or proficiency AP credit. Students who change academic programs at NYCI may request that their maximum timeframe be re-calculated based solely on those “attempted” credits that are applicable to the current program of study. A determination of ineligibility based upon the maximum timeframe standard cannot be reversed under the “Regaining Academic Eligibility” section (below), and no probationary trimester is granted.

Definitions and Grading Policy

“Attempted” credit hours include all college-level credit that is contained in the student’s academic history at NYCI (including transfer credits, advanced placement credits, proficiency credits, and all other credits accepted into the student’s program by the Dean of Academic Affairs Office of NYCI). “Earned” credit hours include all “attempted” credit hours (see above) except those for which a failing, withdrawn, incomplete or other non-passing grade has been issued. Audited credits (AUD grade) are considered neither attempted nor earned.

Consistency with Academic Policy: All issues of grading policy, GPA calculation, etc. are calculated in accordance with NYCI’s academic policies.

Timing of Evaluations and Evaluation Process

NYCI measures academic progress at the end of each trimester. Evaluation of progress will occur shortly after the academic office has posted final grades. Notices of probationary status and/or ineligibility are sent only as a courtesy. Students are expected to be aware of their own academic status. Grades listed as “incomplete” at the time of evaluation will be considered attempted and not earned, but will not affect the GPA.

Probation and Loss of Academic Eligibility

Students who fail to meet the standards defined above will be placed on probation for a period of one trimester. If, upon successful completion of the probationary trimester, the student has returned to “good” academic standing, he/she is entitled to an additional probationary trimester should he/she have future academic difficulty. If a student successfully completes 100% of all coursework attempted within this probationary trimester with a trimester GPA of at least 2.5, but still does not achieve the required cumulative completion percentage and or cumulative GPA, that student will be granted one additional probationary trimester. In all other cases, if a student has not returned to “good” academic standing according to the chart by the end of the probationary trimester, the student will be dismissed from his/her program of study at NYCI and lose eligibility for federal student aid from that point forward.

Data Corrections

If a student’s academic record is changed subsequent to the evaluation date, a student may submit a written request to the Dean of Academic Affairs for re-evaluation of the probation or dismissal determination. The most common situation leading to such a request is the successful resolution of “incomplete” grades.

Continuation as a Non-Matriculated Student

A student who is dismissed from an academic program may be allowed (at the discretion of the Dean of Academic Affairs) to continue as a non-matriculated student. A non-matriculated student is not eligible for state or federal financial aid, and under no circumstances will aid be paid retroactively for courses taken in this manner. Students who are dismissed under the “Maximum Timeframe Standard” will only be allowed to continue in this manner for the purpose of mastering necessary skills proficiencies (Stenographic speed and accuracy) as required for graduation. Once a student has completed coursework/proficiency with grades/skills sufficient to meet the stated requirements, the student must file a written request to the Dean of Academic Affairs to transfer the completed work into a degree program, re-admit the student to a program and/or confer graduation.

Regaining Academic Eligibility

1. Mitigating Circumstances Appeal: A determination of academic dismissal (and ineligibility for financial aid) may be appealed based on mitigating circumstance(s). A mitigating circumstance is defined as an exceptional or unusual event(s) beyond the student’s direct control, which contributed to or caused the academic difficulty. Appeal letters should be addressed to the Dean of Academic Affairs and should include a complete description of the circumstances that led to the academic difficulty and a plan for future academic success. Copies of supporting documentation should be included. All appeals are reviewed by a committee of academic and administrative staff whose determination is final. The committee will report all appeal decisions to the Dean, who will notify the student and the Financial Aid Officer. A mitigating circumstance appeal may not be used to justify a pattern of poor performance or to override the maximum timeframe standard.

2. Regaining Eligibility: Students who have been dismissed (and lost eligibility) may potentially regain probationary academic eligibility by one of four methods: 1) return to NYCI after an absence of not less than twelve months (three full trimesters) and submit transfer credit acceptable to NYCI which will bring the student’s record into compliance with the attempted/earned standard; 2) return to NYCI after an absence of not less than twelve months (three full trimesters) and submit a request for re-evaluation of eligibility and re-admission to the college–such re-evaluation shall be based upon demonstrated academic, personal or career success since leaving NYCI and likelihood of future academic success; 3) make up the academic deficiencies as a non-matriculated student (see “Continuation as a Non-Matriculated Student” above); or 4) be accepted into a different academic discipline at NYCI.

In each of the four circumstances listed above, approval is at the discretion of the Dean of Academic Affairs. The Dean will evaluate the student’s situation and make a judgment of the student’s potential for future academic success. Students for whom the completion of the program will not be mathematically possible within the Maximum Timeframe Standard (see above) will not be approved for regained academic eligibility. The Dean will report all decisions under this section directly to the student, the President, and the Financial Aid Office.

A student who regains academic eligibility under this section will be placed in probationary status for the trimester in which he/she returns, and subject to the probation rules (see “Probation and Loss of Academic Eligibility” above).

Transfer of Credit

Acceptance of Transfer Credits at NYCI
Applicants with past formal post-secondary training may be granted transfer credit toward program completion at NYCI. The Dean of Academic Affairs may grant transfer credit for coursework taken at another accredited school in which a grade of “C” or better was earned. Courses transferred must be substantially equivalent to the corresponding courses for which the student is seeking credit at the NYCI. Transfer credit does not carry a grade and has no impact on a student’s Grade Point Average (GPA).

Students must furnish official transcripts from each accredited post- secondary school previously attended to receive applicable transfer credit. All transcripts must be sent directly from the issuing institution to the Registrar at NYCI. The student should meet with the Registrar during the enrollment process in order to facilitate timely receipt of transcripts. NYCI may request course descriptions from the previous college’s catalog in order to determine course equivalency. Official transcripts and course descriptions, if needed, must be received by the Dean prior to the end of the student’s first term in order to be evaluated for transfer credit. Generally, students may not receive combined transfer and proficiency credits totaling more than 50% of the program for which they are enrolled. Exceptions may be made after review and approval by the Dean of Academic Affairs.

Acceptance of NYCI Credits at Other Schools
NYCI makes no claims of transferability of credits earned at NYCI to other colleges or schools. In all cases, the transferability of credits is at the discretion of the receiving institution, and hence is outside of NYCI’s control. Further, since NYCI’s programs are specifically targeted and career-based, transfer to a dissimilar program will probably result in few credits that are applicable to another discipline.

Withdrawal, Refund and R2T4 Policies

Attendance Policy
Regular attendance in classes is necessary for students to achieve academic success. Instructors shall monitor class attendance periodically throughout the trimester as academically appropriate. Students with excessive absences may be subject to grade reductions and or course failure at the discretion of the instructor. Instructors will also report all attendance issues to the Dean of Academic Affairs, who will attempt to provide academic counseling and/or tutoring as necessary to assist the student.

Students with excessive absences/attendance issues in individual courses may be advised to withdraw from the course if achievement of a passing grade is no longer possible. Students with excessive absences/attendance issues in multiple courses may be administratively withdrawn from the program at the discretion of the Dean of Academic Affairs.

Official Withdrawal Policy
A student who intends to withdraw from the program is required to notify the Dean of Academic Affairs or other appropriate college official of his/her intent to withdraw. Whenever possible, the notification shall be either in written or in-person format. Withdrawal notifications by telephone, e-mail, third-party communication, or other communications method are deemed “official notifications” at the discretion of the Dean (or other designated official) based upon the credibility of the communication. All withdrawal notifications may be subject to verification through follow-up communication to the student.

If it becomes apparent to the Dean of Academic Affairs, based on instructor reports, that a student may have discontinued his/her studies during a trimester without notifying the college, the Dean (or other designated official) will attempt to contact the student to determine the student’s status. If the college is unable to contact the student, the student may be administratively withdrawn from the program at the discretion of the Dean.

Official Date of Withdrawal and the Official Date of Determination

The official date of withdrawal and the official date of determination are determined as described below, for all purposes including the federal “Return to Title IV” (R2T4) calculation and notifications to lenders, guarantors and/or NSLDS.

The date of withdrawal, for a student who withdraws between trimesters or otherwise does not return for a subsequent trimester for any reason (including academic dismissal), shall be the last day of scheduled classes/examinations for the prior trimester. The date of determination shall be the date the college was notified of the student’s intent to withdraw/discontinue, the date the college dismissed the student academically, or the last day of the drop/add period for the subsequent trimester, whichever is earliest.

For a student who is dismissed or withdraws during a trimester, both the official date of withdrawal and the official date of determination shall be the date the student began the official withdrawal process by notifying the college (as detailed in the policy above), the date the college became aware of the student’s intent to withdraw through credible communication with the Dean of Academic Affairs (or other designated official), or the date the student was dismissed/administratively withdrawn for any reason, whichever is earliest.

Tuition Refund Policy
Students who officially withdraw or are dismissed from their program during the early part of a trimester may be entitled to a partial reduction in their tuition as follows:

During the first week of classes 100% refund
During the second week of classes 75% refund
During the third week of classes 50% refund
During the fourth week of classes 25% refund
During the fifth week of classes and after 0% refund

Students who withdraw prior to the 60% point of the trimester may lose partial eligibility for student aid, and thus may owe a balance to NYCI or to the US Department of Education. Students considering withdrawal are strongly encouraged to meet with the Financial Aid Office.

Financial Aid Return Policy (Return to Title IV)
Recipients of Federal Title IV financial aid who withdraw from enrollment at NYCI, or have their enrollment terminated for administrative, disciplinary, attendance, or other reasons will have their financial aid eligibility re-calculated under a formula prescribed by the U.S. Department of Education. This formula is called the “Return to Title IV” or “R2T4″ formula. In general, a student will keep only the pro-rated portion of student aid “earned” through attendance in the first sixty percent of the enrollment period (trimester). Upon completion of the first sixty percent of the trimester, all of a student’s financial aid is considered “earned” and no return of funds is necessary.

The college will calculate the amount of aid earned/retained using the pro-rata R2T4 formula prescribed under Federal regulation. The Financial Aid Office will determine the amount of Title IV aid earned by multiplying the total Title IV aid (other than FWS) for which the student qualified by the percentage of time enrolled. The student is only entitled to the pro-rated portion of the federal student aid received according to the formula, and may be required to return aid funds to the U.S. Department of Education under certain circumstances. More detailed information on the Return of Title IV Funds may be obtained from the Financial Aid Office.

The pro rata refund calculation stated above does not include the registration fee or books, materials and lab fee. If a student drops out of college, any refund that is due will be paid within 45 days of the earliest of (I) date on which the college determines that the student dropped out: (II) expiration of the academic term in which the student withdrew; or (III) expiration of the period of enrollment for which the student has been charged.

Student Right-to-Know Act Disclosures*

Follow this link for information about the Graduation/Retention Rates for students enrolled at NYCI, and other school information stored at the National Center for Education Statistics.

Gainful Employment

 

Voter Registration

NYCI encourages our students to be active participants in the American political system as part of being responsible members of their community. Voter registration forms are available year-round at the school’s reception desk. Further, each year the school celebrates “Constitution Day” on September 17 and offers activities to educate our students about the U.S. system of government and their role within it.

Drug, Alcohol and Sex Offense Statutes

NYCI encourages our students to educate themselves regarding the law and understand the penalties for violating the law. Colleges in New York State are required to post the descriptions and penalties for violations of the NYS Controlled Substances Statutes, the NYS Alcohol Laws pertaining to persons under 21 years of age, and the NYS Sex Offense Statutes.

Privacy and Information Security

Privacy Policy

NYCI carefully protects all personal information in its possession regarding students and their families. The college employs office procedures and password-protected computer systems to ensure the security of paper and electronic records. The college does not disclose its security procedures to students or the general public to protect the effectiveness of those procedures. Access to social security numbers and other personally identifiable information (PII) is strictly limited to those School Officials (see definition below) with a need-to-know, as determined by the Associate Campus Director.

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA) provides current and former students with the right to inspect and review educational records, the right to seek to amend those records, the right to limit disclosure of information from the records and the right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education. Applicants or students may also waive their rights to inspect confidential letters or statements of recommendation.

School Official

In accordance with FERPA, the student’s consent is not required when a School Official has a legitimate educational interest in the student’s educational record; that is, if the official needs to review this information in order to fulfill his/her professional responsibility. However, this does not constitute authorization to share that information with a third party without the student’s written consent.

A “School Official” is a person employed by the college in an administrative, supervisory, academic, research, or support staff position; a person or company with whom the college has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor or accrediting agency); a person serving on the Board of Directors; or a student serving in an official position/capacity, or assisting a School Official in performing his/ her tasks.

Financial Aid Information

Certain information necessary for the processing of federal financial aid programs may be disclosed to parents of dependent students. In order for a person to be considered a “parent” for this purpose, the individual must be listed as such on the student’s FAFSA application.

Directory Information

School Officials may not disclose personally identifiable information about a student nor permit inspection of a student’s records without the student’s written permission, unless such action is covered by certain exceptions permitted by FERPA. Under the provisions of the Act, a college may disclose information about a student if it has designated that the information is “Directory Information”. NYCI has designated the following as Directory Information:

student’s name
hometown
telephone number
email address
previous institution(s) attended
enrollment status
dates of attendance
academic program
date of graduation/expected date of graduation
honors or awards received
Student’s Rights Under FERPA

Right to Review Educational Records: FERPA affords students certain rights with respect to their educational records. Students have the right to review their educational records within 45 days of the day the college receives a written request for access. Students requesting a review should submit to the President a written request that identifies the record(s) they wish to inspect. The President will notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected.

Right to Request an Amendment: Students have the right to request an amendment to educational records that are believed to be inaccurate. Students requesting a change must write to the School Official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate. If the School Official decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, NYCI will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of his or her right to a hearing with the President regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing.

Right to Consent to Disclosures: Students have the right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s educational records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent.

Right to File Complaint: Students have the right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by NYCI to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the office that administers FERPA is:

Family Policy Compliance Office

U.S. Department of Education

400 Maryland Avenue, SW

Washington, DC 20202-4605

Students or other persons with questions about the information
posted above should contact the Dean of Academic Affairs’ Office at (917)-210-4737.

Other Miscellaneous Information

The NYCI Catalog contains detailed information about our school and our programs. The catalog is available by visiting the Admissions Office, and is also available for download through this link:

Download the NYCI Catalog

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Gainful Employment

Medical Office Specialist
Healthcare Management Associate (AOS)
Medical Administrative Assistant
Medical Billing/Coding Associate
Stenotype Court Reporter
Stenotype Hearing Reporter
Paralegal Studies
Paralegal Office Assistant